We Fight Sin by Loving God

Sin is attractive. It is alluring. If it wasn't, we wouldn't be drawn to it so often. Through personal experience and conversations with others, I know sin can feel overwhelming powerful at times. In response, we often enter our battles with sin carrying a pea shooter for a weapon, while sin crouches like a powerful lion. The deeply entrenched idols of our hearts, which drive our sinful behaviors, can not be fought through a few well-devised strategies.

Two Ways we Try to Fight Sin

Sin can take on many forms. Whether it is an addiction to pornography, struggles with anger, persistent laziness, engaging in gossip or a pursuit of our own glory, sin can pounce on us when we least expect it. I have seen two common tactics to fight sin, which can be helpful, but are woefully insufficient alone. The first is that we develop strategies to induce behavior modification. For example, we might install monitoring software on our computers, so that when we are tempted to look at pornography, we don't because we know someone will see the report and hold us accountable. This is a good and helpful strategy. I think of this strategy as "building fences" and I wrote about it in another post titled, Fighting Sin by Building Fences. It is necessary, but alone, it is insufficient to battle the deeper idols which drive sin.

The second common strategy is to demonize whatever is leading us to sin. If I don't want to be lazy anymore, I remind myself over and over that slothfulness is sin. I remind myself that "a slack hand causes poverty, but the hand of the diligent makes rich (Proverbs 10:4)." This can be a helpful strategy, but it does have two problems. First, it can lead us to respond in extreme ways and walk off the road into the opposite ditch. As we demonize laziness, we can make an idol out of ambition and neglect the type of intentional rest God also wants for us. The second problem with this strategy is that we often end up calling evil that which God has given us as good. As we remind ourselves about the dangers of laziness, we often loop in all forms of rest. Even those God has given to us for our good, and call it all evil. For another example, when we demonize pornography (as we should), we can often make all sexuality to be evil in our minds, even though God has given it to be enjoyed in the right ways.

Why is Sin so Appealing?

In our battle with sin, we need to ask ourselves why sin is so appealing. What makes us drawn to it? One of the primary answers is that sin promises to satisfy our desires. It offers solutions to our deepest longings. If we long to be accepted and included, we may engage in gossip, because it makes us feel included. If we have a juicy piece of information to share, then we get to have an audience. We get to feel important, even if only for a couple minutes. Or if we want to be listened to and respected, we might respond in anger. Stern glances and loud voices seem to demand other's attention. Our anger gets us what we want and fulfills the desire we have for respect.

Sin offers us fulfillment, but it can never ultimately deliver on its promise. Gossip might gain us some acceptance immediately, but in the long run, it undermines our relationships with others and erodes the sort of relationships we seek. Anger might gain some initial respect, but it will never develop the sort of relationship that produces long-term respect from others. Sin is appealing at first, but cannot deliver on its promise.

Fighting Sin at its Roots

In the end, we need a much deeper solution to our sin. We cannot simply modify our behavior because that does not deal with the deeper longings that sin promises to fulfill. Behavioral sin is the result of heart idols. Sin has layers, and as we peel them back, we uncover those hidden motivations and desires that drive our sin. If we want to fight sin, we need to address them at their source. Otherwise, we are just mowing over weeds. At first, it looks good, but eventually the weeds will grow back. Another pass with the lawnmower is another temporary solution. Like weeds, we need to deal with the root cause of our sin. (see post, Understanding the 3-Layers of Sin)

At its most basic level, sin pursues something that only God can offer. The longing for significance that drives the pursuit of our own glory, is ultimately found in relationship with God. The desire for love that leads us to pursue acceptance through gossip or our need for respect which we seek in our angry outbursts are ultimately found only in the cross. The significance we want is found in our identity as God's children. Love is found in the unconditional acceptance of God through the blood of Jesus. Respect is established in the humble service that Jesus models for us and then calls us to as his followers.

A Surpassing Love for God

In the end, our battle with sin is fought by loving God. A surpassing love for God is the great remedy for our sin. As we experience the goodness of God, it will reveal the insufficient offer of sin. Matthew Henry once wrote, "The joy of the Lord will arm us against the assaults of our spiritual enemies and put our mouths out of taste for those pleasures with which the tempter baits his hooks." As our affections increase for our savior, sin become less attractive because we see it for the folly that it is. Like good literature - once you learn to appreciate quality writing, you can no longer waste your time on drivel. When you gain a surpassing love for God, sin loses its appeal. In the battle with our sin, we need to fight it on all fronts. We must employ multiple strategies, but we absolutely cannot neglect our need for a robust love for God. You will never win the battle against sin without it.